Tuesday, March 24, 2009

From The Met to The Met: a walk across Central Park to the West Side

This afternoon I went to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (a.k.a. "The Met"), located on the east side of Central Park in the lower 80s, to have a second view of Pierre Bonnard: The Late Interiors, on which I plan to do a post here soon. Afterward, I was to meet my wife at the Metropolitan Opera House (a.k.a. "The Met") for a panel discussion on Wagner's Ring cycle. Since I had enough time, and the weather was pleasant though nippy, I decided to walk from The Met to The Met, which involved a diagonal crossing of Central Park.

About halfway across the Park, I was approaching the Bethesda Fountain. The descending sun reflecting off a cloud mass made this an almost Turner-esque scene.

Closer to the Fountain, I could see the great old apartment buildings along Central Park West. The building with the twin Gothic spires is the Beresford; the one near the left edge of the photo with the two blocky art deco towers is the San Remo.

Looking back, I caught this view of the Boathouse.

Having passed the Fountain, I looked back to capture this view. Note the elongated tree shadows, cast by the late afternoon sun, curving across the sloping lawn.

The still leafless trees afforded a clear view of the buildings on Central Park South.

On the West Side, I was struck by this row of late nineteenth century brownstones on 69th Street, and their contrast with the high rise buildings beyond. Note also the "bishop's crook" streetlamp pole at the right of the photo.

Here's the newly rebuilt Alice Tully Hall and Julliard classrooms, at the corner of 68th and Broadway.

At last I reach The [other] Met, and am greeted by Marc Chagall's angel.